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Sprouted Gluten Free Bread

A lovely light, moist bread that's sturdy enough for all your favourite toppings.

Sprouted gluten free bread has a crusty exterior and soft, spongey crumb. It’s sturdy enough to hold all your favourite toast or sandwich toppings and has a light flavour that reminds us of cornbread! Gluten free bread can be tricky because gluten is what gives dough stretch and structure. In this recipe, we are using psyllium husk to do gluten’s job. 

Sprouted Gluten Free Bread features light and naturally sweet sprouted millet flour and a little bit of sprouted buckwheat flour for extra flavour and a crunchy crust. You may also notice that it’s quite a small loaf compared to gluten bread, this is because it bakes better as a small loaf and because this bread is best when very fresh. We suggest making more loaves rather than trying to make this loaf larger. 

tips for making sprouted gluten free bread

  • The dough should be sticky, almost like a batter, and a little bit spongy. I like to use a sturdy spatula to transfer the dough to the counter.
  • Rising time can vary depending on room temperature, the yeast you use, etc. Use the time as a guideline, but wait until the bread has doubled in size. It will rise faster in a warm area like on top of the fridge or in a cool oven with just the light turned on. 
  • This bread bakes best in a dutch oven. If you don’t have one, you can improvise one by baking on a parchment lined sheet pan. Then take a deep oven safe dish or aluminum barbeque tray and place it upside down on top. Be sure your pan is deep enough to allow the bread to rise. The purpose of the “lid” is to trap steam inside, helping the bread rise, and to prevent it from browning too quickly.

ingredient tips and substitutions

  • Warm Water: can be straight from the tap, no heating necessary. Simply let the water run until it is warm to the touch.
  • Instant Yeast: you can substitute active dry yeast but it must be dissolved in the liquid first. The rising time may also need to be increased.
  • Honey: you can use another liquid or granulated sugar of choice. 
  • Olive Oil: any neutral tasting oil will work
  • Psyllium Husk: be sure to use whole psyllium husk and not psyllium husk powder. Psyllium husk can be found at most health food stores, bulk stores and online. 

Can i make vegan gluten free bread?

Absolutely! Just swap the honey for the same amount of your favourite liquid or granulated sugar.

how to properly measure flour

A kitchen scale is recommended because it is the most accurate way to measure flour. However, if you are using cup measures the best method is to spoon it in, then sweep excess flour off the top with a straight edge.

can i mix it by hand?

Yes, but it will require some arm power! Mix vigorously by hand for 5-10 minutes.

how long does sprouted gluten free bread last?

This bread is best if enjoyed the same day it’s baked. Once completely cool, we recommend slicing and freezing any remaining bread.

Sprouted Gluten Free Bread

A lovely light, moist bread that's sturdy enough for all your favourite toppings.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Rising Time: 2 hours
Servings: 1 Loaf

What You'll Need:

  • 1¼ cups (190g) Sprouted Millet Flour
  • ¼ cup + 2 tbsp (60g) Sprouted Buckwheat Flour
  • ¾ cup (120g) corn or potato starch
  • 3 tbsp (18g) whole psyllium husk (not psyllium powder)
  • 1¼ tsp (7g) salt
  • 2 tsp (10g) baking powder
  • 2¼ tsp (9g or 1 packet) instant yeast
  • 3 tbsp (60g) honey
  • ¼ cup (46g) olive oil
  • 1½ cups (340g) warm water (divided)

How To Make It:

  • Prepare a cloth lined banneton/proofing basket or a mixing bowl lined with a lint-free dish towel by coating generously with millet flour (you can always dust off excess later but you really don't want your bread to stick).
  • In a small bowl, combine psyllium and ½ cup of water. Set aside for a few minutes to gel.
  • With a hand or stand mixer, combine ingredients with the remaining cup of water. Once everything is incorporated, increase to medium speed and mix for 5 minutes. The dough should be like the consistency of a thick batter and a little spongy.
  • Lightly dust your counter with millet flour and coat you hands with a little bit of olive oil. Scrape out the dough onto the counter and gently form it into a ball with your hands.
  • Place the dough into the prepared basket/bowl with the smooth side down. Cover the bowl and allow to rise until doubled in size (about 1½ - 2 hours).
  • About 30 minutes before your dough is ready, preheat your oven to 450°F. If you're using a dutch oven (recommended) preheat the dutch oven as well.
  • Carefully flip your dough onto a piece of parchment paper and gently dust off any excess flour. Using a sharp knife, razor blade or bread lame, make several cuts on the top of the loaf (this is decorative but it also controls how the bread expands).
  • Bake for 25 minutes covered and an additional 5-10 minutes uncovered, or until nicely browned. If you have a thermometer, the internal temperature should reach 210°F.

Notes

If you don’t have a dutch oven, you can improvise one by baking on a parchment lined sheet pan. Then take a deep oven safe dish or a deep dish aluminum barbeque tray and place it upside down on top. Be sure your pan is deep enough to allow the bread to rise. The purpose of the "lid" is to trap steam inside, helping the bread rise, and to prevent it from browning too quickly.
Have you made this recipe? Tag @secondspringfoods on Instagram!
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4 thoughts on “Sprouted Gluten Free Bread

  1. Hi there 🙂 – is the psyllium husk necessary? What is its purpose?

    many thanks!
    M

    1. Hello, I would very much like to try this GF bread recipe. What size Dutch oven do you recommend??

      1. Our dutch oven is 10 inches across, but this is a fairly small loaf so you could probably get away with a smaller one. In case you don’t have the right size, in the notes section I give instructions for how to bake this recipe without a dutch oven.

    2. Yes, the psyllium husk is what mimics gluten to hold the bread together. The bread will not have enough structure without it and there aren’t any good substitutes.

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